Common Myths about Cataracts

When it comes to taking care of your eyes as you age you will certainly receive a lot of information both accurate and inaccurate.  Wading through the information received can be daunting.  Cataracts are often a center of myths and tales associated with seniors and vision care.  We have centered this installment around breaking the myths that surround the formation and surgical procedures associated with cataracts. 

Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness throughout the world, more than glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and macular degeneration collectively. They are more common in seniors than any other demographic.  Estimates suggest fifty percent of Americans will have had cataracts by the time they are eighty years old.  It is important that seniors have correct information, an understanding of their vision condition, and what options they have for correction.

The Myths and Truths of Cataracts

Myth #1: Cataracts Grow on The Eye

Truth: Cataracts have thought to be a growth on the eye however that is not the truth at all.  Cataracts are a result of protein fibers that clump together and creating a clouding of the lens of the eye.  The cloud causes light to be scattered or even blocked completely as it passes through the lens.  This does not allow the retina to receive a clear image.  Cataracts are caused by:

  • Overexposure to Ultraviolet Light
  • Eye Injury
  • Result of Diabetes

Myth #2: The Only Symptom of Cataracts Is Blurred Vision

Truth: Although blurred vision is the most common symptom individuals report when experiencing cataracts, it is not the only one. Other symptoms include:

  • Extreme Light Sensitivity
  • Changes in Vision Prescription
  • Double Vision
  • Changes in Perception of Colors
  • Night Vision Difficulty

Myth #3: Cataracts Are Preventable

Truth: Cataracts are not preventable.  There are different strategies that can be taken to reduce the risk of developing cataracts or to slow the progression of the disease.  These include:

  • Yearly Eye Exams
  • Healthy Diet Rich in Fruits and Veggies
  • Don’t Smoke
  • Avoid Excessive Alcohol Usage
  • Wear Sunglasses with UVA & UVB Protection

Myth #4: Cataract Surgery is Dangerous

Truth: Cataract is in fact not dangerous, it is actually one of the safest vision surgeries.  With advancements in technology, individuals need minimal sedation and cataract surgery has a success rate of over ninety-five percent.  Recovery from cataract surgery includes:

  • Refrain from Eye Rubbing
  • No Lifting of Heavy Objects
  • Avoid Driving

Myth #5: Cataracts Come Back

Truth: Once a cataract is removed from the lens through surgical means, it will not return.  A “secondary” cataract may develop.  This occurs when the membrane holding the foreign lens implant in place becomes cloudy.  This is corrected with a simple, painless procedure called a YAG laser capsulotomy.  An eye surgeon will create a small opening in the membrane to assist in restoring the sharpness in vision.

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.

Warning Signs Of Cataracts

Cataracts are a clouding in the lens of an eye that causes the impairment of an individual’s vision.  This eye disease affects over twenty-five million Americans that are 40 and over.  Once individuals have reached 75, over half of them will be diagnosed with cataracts. 

As adults age the eye’s lens starts to yellow and harden which creates blurry vision, dull perception of colors, and night time driving becomes difficult.  Cataracts do not get better and in fact get worse overtime.  In fact, cataracts have several stages as they progress.  It is important to treat the symptoms of cataracts in order to slow or stop cataracts from getting worse.  In order to get a proper diagnosis and treatment plan it is crucial to visit an ophthalmologist.  Planning treatment for cataracts slows down the need for cataract surgery.

Early Warning Signs of Cataracts

Cataracts range in severity and the treatment will depend on the development and type of cataract you have.  Early signs of cataracts include:

Cloudy Vision:

Fuzzy spots are the most obvious early sign of cataracts.  If individuals start to experience small, fuzzy spots in your field of vision that seem to worsen over time, you may be developing one of the first sign of cataracts.   These signs will start to make normal, daily activities harder than ever before.  If you notice the quick onset of cloudy vision it is important to get into the eye doctor sooner rather than later.

Difficult Night Vision:

Individuals with the early stages of cataracts also mention a gradual decrease in vision at night.  Changes to vision may include darkening or dimming and may also lead to tinges of brown and yellow.  During the day changes may not be as noticeable because there is light to balance vision that is dimming however, at night it is instantly noticeable. 

Light Sensitivity: 

Individuals with emergent cataracts experience discomfort with bright lights.  This becomes more and more difficult to manage as cataracts worsen.  If you notice you are squinting or closing your eyes more around bright light or noticing headaches that come on quickly from flashes and bright lights, it is time to schedule an appointment with an ophthalmologist. 

Halos and Glares:

As cataracts worsen, the lens of the eye hardens and becomes cloudier.  Some cataract suffers mention the appearance of a glare or halo in their field of vision.  The light that passes through the cataract is diffracted which causes a glare and ringlets around bright sources of light.  During the day the halos and glares are less noticeable then that are in the evening. 

Vision Changes:

During the earliest stages of cataracts, individuals may notice changes in vision.  Regular eye exams are crucial for older adults.  In fact, ophthalmologists often detect cataracts before individuals notice a difference in vision. 

Cataract damage is not reversible however, there are some things you can do to slow down their progression.  It is important to talk with your eye doctor first to determine if cataract surgery is needed before cataracts worsen.  Some ways to increase the health of your eye include eating a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids, wearing sunglasses, determine if your prescription medicine worsen the effects of cataracts, and treat dry eyes with daily eye drops. 

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.

Do the Benefits of Glaucoma Surgery Outweigh the Risks?

As with any surgical procedure there are potential risks that need to be weighed against the benefits, Glaucoma is no different.  Even the most advanced cases of Glaucoma can be treated, patients need to collaborate with their eye surgeon to ensure the benefits offset the risks.

Glaucoma is a disease that is associated with aging.  It is a disease of the eye that causes advanced decline of the optic nerve.  The optic nerve which is at the back of the eye carries the visual message from the retina to your brain. Glaucoma is caused by increased pressure within the eye that doesn’t provide an environment for the nerve’s health.

In order to treat Glaucoma, the IOP (intraocular pressure) must be lowered.  Lowering the intraocular pressure prevents (or slows) the damage to the optic nerve.  Treating Glaucoma begins with the use of medication.  If this fails to treat or your eyes do not tolerate the treatment your ophthalmologists will often turn to surgical procedures.

There are two different types of surgery that can be performed to treat Glaucoma.  One method is using a miniscule incision into the trabeculectomy.  This can be done with or without the ExPRESS microshunt implantation, tube shunt implantation (which is a glaucoma drainage device), and cyclophotocoagulation.  Another surgical Glaucoma procedure that is often performed is known as MIGS, or minimally invasive glaucoma surgery.  Surgical procedures all have their own unique set of risks and rewards. Before you have any surgical procedure on your eye, especially for the treatment of Glaucoma, it is important to have talk with your surgeon about your specific diagnosis and the benefits and dangers of the specific Glaucoma surgery best for your specific situation.

Glaucoma Surgery Benefits Outweigh the Risks in Most Situations Even in Advanced Cases

There are risks involved with any surgery however, the results with Glaucoma surgery are typically successful.  Success in Glaucoma surgery slows the progression of the disease.  Success means that the intended eye pressure was achieved.  If Glaucoma was left untreated, the loss of your vision is almost guaranteed. Surgery can help to prevent additional vision loss, often improving your vision.  This however is temporary as the damage with Glaucoma has already occurred and is permanent.  Surgery doesn’t reverse the damage it does however slow down the progression.

Although side effects do occur with Glaucoma, they are rare.  Here is a list of occasional side effects that patients have reported:

•     Vision Loss

•     Bleeding

•     Infection

•     Eye Pressure

•     Scarring

•     Cataracts

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.

Is LASIK Right for You?

Having LASIK performed may mean that you no longer have to wear corrective lenses to properly see. However, how do you know if you are a good candidate or not?  What should you consider when you are weighing out your corrective vision options?  Obviously if you are tired of having to put contacts in every morning or are sick of wearing glasses you start to consider laser eye surgery

LASIK is a type of refractive eye surgery that is done that helps patience achieve 20/25 vision or greater.  This is optimal for most activities that we will participate in.  Often, patients do eventually need glasses as they age or even for nighttime driving.

The complications experienced with LASIK are rare.  In fact, LASIK has a high success rate.  Dry eye is the most common issue experienced after LASIK.  This usually ends up clearing up with the use of eye drops.  It can last up to a few months however, this is rare.

Your specific results will depend on a number of factors including your refractive error.  Patients that suffer from mild nearsightedness have reported greater success from refractive surgery than patients with a high degree of far or near sightedness or an astigmatism. 

What Happens During LASIK?

There are a number of variations of laser refractive surgery.  For our purposes we will refer to them under the term LASIK. With normal vision, images are focused on the retina in the back of the eye.  When your eye sight is less than perfect it means that the image is being focused elsewhere, which results in blurred vision. 

Normally, images are focused on the retina which is in the back of your eye. With nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia) or astigmatism, they end up being focused elsewhere, resulting in blurred vision.  This is corrected by reshaping the cornea to provide the proper refraction thus correcting your vision.   Before your surgery begins your eye, surgeon will take detailed measurements of your eye. The laser is then used to properly remove parts of the corneal tissue until proper vision has been achieved. 

In order to be a candidate for LASIK there are a number of requirements that must be met.  Patients must be in good health and free of diseases that could restrict healing.  Overall you must have healthy eyes that suffer only a moderate degree of refractive errors and you are not or have not experienced any unusual vision issues.  Age related vision disorders such as cataracts are not cured during LASIK.  Cataract surgery is different than LASIK.  If you have an active job or lifestyle where you can not take time off to recover, then LASIK is not appropriate for you.  Recovering from LASIK surgery is fairly simple but does require you to avoid intense workouts or activities where you could suffer a blow to the head for at least a month. 

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.

Answering Questions Common to LASIK Surgery

Preparing for any surgical procedure comes with its fair share of anxiety, LASIK is no different.  Laser surgery for vision correction has a number of benefits.  Knowing the end benefit, vision without corrective contact lenses or glasses, is only half the battle.  Preparation ahead of time to put your mind at ease is the other half.  Below we will answer the top questions we get during LASIK consultations.  As always, if you have questions that did not get answered during your FREE consultation with the LASIK specialists at Rohr Eye & Laser Center, patients can call the office at any time.

Will LASIK hurt?

The number one question we are asked involved the pain level that is experienced with LASIK.  The truth is that most patients experience very little pain or discomfort during surgery.  In fact, many patients explain the sensation as a slight pressure that is felt as the laser is reshaping the cornea.  Of course, everyone’s pain tolerance is different but overall this is the experience patients have described after their procedure.

What occurs during the LASIK procedure?

The actual LASIK procedure itself is fairly quick and easy.  Numbing drops are applied to the eyes.  Once this occurs, doctors will cut a very thin flap on the surface of the cornea.  The surgeon will use the laser to shape the cornea according to the prescription from the most recent eye exam.  After this is finished the eye surgeon will carefully place the flap back into place and perform the same procedure on the other eye.  Lasers are used in both the creation of the flap and shaping the cornea although in the past a thin blade had been used to create the flap.

Is LASIK performed on both eyes at the same time?

YES!  Laser vision correction can be performed on both eyes at one time.  With LASIK, vision improvement is virtually instantaneous, and healing is minimal.  During LASIK the laser is only used for about 60 seconds per eye.  Although LASIK can be performed on both eyes at the same time some patients prefer to have one eye done at a time.  This is possible however, rare.

Do surgeons use anesthesia during LASIK?

No, anesthesia is not given during the LASIK procedure but instead eye drops are put into the eye just prior to the procedure.  Some patients with higher levels of anxiety about the procedure require oral medication to be given for relaxation.  Needles and intravenous drugs are not required.

How long does the LASIK process take?

LASIK is a quick process surprisingly.  On average the procedure can take less than 15 minutes once the patient is settled in the treatment room.  The laser aspect of the procedure usually takes less than 60 seconds per eye.

If I blink during LASIK what happens?

Surgeons use a speculum to keep patients’ eyes from blinking.  Some patients remark that there is a slight pressure from the speculum.  Patients are told to focus on a blinking light throughout the procedure.  Movements of the eye are expected, lasers that are used include an eye tracker which accounts for movement and helps to ensure accurate delivery of laser pulses.  

What are the side effects of LASIK?

Although infrequently experienced there are some side effects that patients experience following LASIK.  The most common side effect is dry eye which is easily remedied through over-the-counter artificial tears.  Rare side effects include:

  • Inconsistent vision
  • Difficult night vision with halos
  • Sensitivity to light

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.

What Should I Expect at My LASIK Consultation?

When you seek a consultation from a surgeon specializing in LASIK it is to determine if you are a candidate for laser vision corrections surgery.  If it is determined that you are a candidate, the surgeon will begin discussing the most appropriate surgical option to correct your unique vision issue.  During the consultation you will be educated on the benefits and risks of LASIK surgery.   It is important to remember that a consultation with a LASIK surgeon does not obligate you to have the procedure nor does it mean that you are no longer able to ask questions and gather more information.  A consultation is the starting point into the process of determining if surgery is the vision correction route best suited for you.

Candidates must meet a certain set of criteria before they are considered for LASIK which includes:

Age:

LASIK candidates must be eighteen years or older.

Health:

In order to be a candidate for LASIK, patients must be generally healthy.  They should be free of health problems such as diabetes, vascular disease, autoimmune disease, or on medication that interferes with the immune response. 

Eye Health/Problems:

Candidates should also be free of eye disease including: glaucoma, cataracts, corneal diseases, retinal and optic nerve disease, or keratoconus.  They should also not have eye conditions such as herpes zoster and simplex.  Surgeons will do an eye exam before surgery however, it is important that candidates inform them of issues such as lazy eye, eye muscle imbalance, and other eye conditions that can affect healing.  Candidates should also inform eye surgeons of other health issues such as mental health or issues with health.  Obviously, the eye should also be free of any injury or infection.  Dry eye should also not affect candidates.

Pregnancy/Nursing:

If you are pregnant or nursing you will not be eligible for LASIK.  In fact, LASIK candidates must have had at least three menstrual cycles after they are done nursing and not expecting in order to be eligible for laser surgery.  Pregnancy hormones may affect the effectiveness of your prescription which also makes them ineligible for LASIK.

Stable Vision:

LASIK vision candidates need to have had stable vision for at least one year before they are considered for laser vision surgery procedures. 

Contacts:

In order for patients to have LASIK they must stop wearing their contacts for at least two weeks prior to the surgery.  This helps to stabilize the cornea and will give surgeons an accurate valuation of your prescription prior to the procedure.

LASIK is a viable option in the treatment of nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatisms.  The goal of LASIK is to reduce the dependency of glasses and contacts with the end goal of 20/20 vision, although this is not guaranteed.

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.

A Comprehensive Look at Refractive and Laser Eye Surgery


Refractive and laser eye surgery, known also as vision correction surgery, is implied to surgical procedures that repair problems with vision.  In the last decade there have been huge developments in the process of vision correction using lasers.  Both refractive and laser eye surgery allow patients to see better than they previously. 

Many laser eye vision correction surgeries are done by reshaping the eyes cornea.  The cornea is the front part of the eye that lets light pass through it and focus it on the retina, which is the back of the eye.  Other surgical procedures are done by replacing the natural lens of the eye.

LASIK, otherwise known as laser in-situ keratomileusis, is a surgery that assists in nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatisms.  The surgeon will reshape the tissues found underneath the cornea, so the light can focus properly.  A flap is made in the outer layer of the cornea in order to access the tissues that lay underneath.  This flap is what differentiates LASIK from other surgical vision procedures.  During LASIK surgeons may also use wavefront technology.  This technology creates a detailed picture of the cornea to use as a guide during surgery.

During Epi-LASIK, a surgeon separates the thin layers of tissue from the cornea and then reshape them using a laser.  The area is protected by using a soft contact lens to hold the flap in place while the tissues are healing.  

PRK, otherwise known as photorefractive keratectomy, is a surgery that assists in the correction of mild to moderate nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatisms.  Similar to LASIK a laser is used in PRK to reshape the cornea.  In PRK the laser is only used on the cornea and not the tissues underneath.  Similar to LASIK, wavefront technology is used in PRK to obtain a picture of the cornea.

LASEK, otherwise known as laser epithelial keratomileusis, is a surgery that is very similar to PRK that assists in nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatisms. Surgeons create a flap and use an alcohol solution that loosens the tissue and the laser is then used to reshape the cornea.  Once this part of the procedure is complete the surgeon will put a soft contact in place to hold the flap while it heals. 

During Epi-LASEK, a surgeon cuts a small flap within the cornea while using an alcohol solution to separate the thin layer of tissue for the cornea, reshapes it with the laser, and is protected by a soft contact lens holding the flap in place for healing.

RLE, refractive lens exchange is known by a few different common names including PRELEX, CLE, and RLR.  This is the same surgery that is done for cataracts.  Surgeons make a small cut at the edge of the cornea.  They then remove the eyes natural lens and replace it with a plastic or silicone lens.  This surgery is used to correct severe farsightedness and nearsightedness.  The surgery works for patients with dry eye, thin corneas, and minor issues with their corneas. 

Surgical laser vision correction is safe and effective.  Similar to any surgery there are known side effects that can include: infection, a delay in healing, under or over correction, worse vision, corneal haze, halo effect, regression, and/or flap damage.  All of which are rare but can occur.  It is important to always talk in depth with your laser vision correction surgeon before the procedure about any questions or concerns you may have.

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.



How Exactly Is My Cataract Going to Be Removed?

Cataracts have become a common complaint amongst the aging population.  In fact, cataract surgery is one of the most common surgeries performed in the United States today.  Thankfully, surgery is very successful step in treating cataracts and improving patients’ vision.  The word surgery itself seems to invoke a lot of fear let alone pairing it with the word eye. The good news is that most patients undergoing cataract surgery not only experience improved vision, but they do so with little to no side effects. 

Cataract surgery is performed by making two incredibly small incisions in the cornea. The cornea is a transparent dome that is made up of tissue that covers the front of your eye.  The incisions that are made into this tissue are less than 3 millimeters.  This is very small incision. 

Once the two incisions have been made, your cataract surgeon will inject a gooey thick material into the front of your eye to help it keep its natural shape while the surgery is performed.  The goo that is injected is a substance that naturally occurs in your body.  The thickness of the bi-product ensures that leakage does not occur while the surgery is performed.

Phacoemulsification is the technical name of the cataract surgery we are discussing.  In Phacoemulsification your surgeon creates a lens capsule to hold the lens in place.  This is done by creating an opening with in the natural sac and then separating the lens from the capsule by using a salt solution.  Once a surgeon has opened the capsule the lens can move freely within it. A specialized ultrasound is used to break up the lens into a bunch of small pieces and suck it out of the eye. 

Before Phacoemulsification, cataract surgery looked a lot different.  In prior surgeries cataracts were removed by making a large cut in the cornea and removing the lens in one solid piece.  This procedure required an extended recovery time as well as increased risk of infection, complication,and lasting side effects. 

In Phacoemulsification once the lens pieces are removed, more goo is injected into the lens capsule to help keep it open and to make room for the placement of the new lens.  The new lens is then placed into the lens capsule and allowed to unfold naturally.  The goo material will have kept the shape of the eye throughout surgery and the two small incisions will self-heal. 

This surgical option to removing cataracts was introduced over forty years ago and remains the most popular method used by eye surgeons in removing cataracts today.

Rohr Eye& Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.

LASIK: A Popular Laser Eye Surgery Method

LASIK is a widely practiced method of laser eye surgery.  Vision is improved using laser vision correction techniques like LASIK through a reshaping of the tissue underneath the top later of the eye.

It is often hard to really describe what LASIK is and what is involved without using a lot of technical mumbo jumbo.  The jest of it boils down to the fact that when vision needs correcting and a surgical option is sought, whether we are correcting nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatisms, a procedure using a refractive laser is performed to restore proper vision in the eye.  LASIK is the most popular and most widely accepted surgical method used in treating refractive errors and is done by reshaping the cornea in a manner that allows light to focus properly.

LASIK surgeons create a flap near the front of the eye that exposes the inner layers of tissue on the cornea to allow the laser to shape the cornea.  This is done by removing exposed tissue that is preventing the light to focus as need be.  The surgery is completed when the surgeon seals up the eye by closing the flap.  The eye is given time to heal and vision often returns to near perfect within a matter of twenty-four hours.

Benefits of LASIK

  • Experience: LASIK is a form of laser vision correction that has been in place form more than twenty years. Surgeons have been performing this procedure for many years and are very experienced correcting several defects within the cornea of the eye.
  • Recovery: The recovery process is unlike any other. Your vision starts to become clearer within just a couple hours of surgery.  What other surgical procedure of this nature do you see drastic results like this?
  • Obtainability: LASIK is a very popular procedure and performed across the state of Michigan. Rohr Eye & Laser Center sees patients from all around the area.  It is safe to say that almost every office offering laser vision correction offers LASIK as an available procedure.

Possible Side Effects

All surgeries have the potential for side effects and LASIK is no different, although highly rare.  Possible side effects can include:

  • Flap Complications: In order to reach the cornea a flap is made in the outer layer of the eye. Side effects to the flap specifically can include infection, inflammation, and dislocation.  The flap is intended to adhere back into location right after surgery however is it doesn’t seal back together with the corneal tissue, issues can arise.  The flap rests on the eye so there is opportunity present for it to dislodge during healing.  Therefore, it is recommended to lay low and avoid any contact sports or intense activities during the healing process.
  • Dry Eye: Dry eyes can occur after laser vision correction surgery. Nerves in the eye are cut during the procedure which can reduce the sensation to blink.  When a person doesn’t blink often enough it will not stay as lubricated as it needs to.  Although uncomfortable, dry eyes will often improve quickly.

LASIK is one of many laser vision correction methods performed at Rohr Eye and Laser Center.  For a detailed, FREE consultation call the office to schedule a time to meet with our dedicated team.

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.

 

 

Coping with Cataracts

Cataracts are a way of life for people as they age.  If you notice a cloudiness in your vision, you are most likely developing cataracts.  The clouding is in your eye’s natural lens that lies behind the iris and pupil.  This eye disease is the leading cause of blindness throughout the world.  More people have cataracts across the world than the combination of diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, and glaucoma according to PBA, Prevent Blindness America.  In fact, 22 million Americans over the age of 40 are experiencing cataracts.

Three Types of Cataracts

Subcapsular: This is a cataract that develops at the back of the lens.  People that suffer from diabetes or take a high dose of steroid medicine are at a greater risk of developing subcapsular cataracts.

Nuclear: This type of cataract is often associated with aging and forms deep within the nucleus of the lens.

Cortical:  Cortical cataracts appear in the lens cortex (part of the lens surrounding the central nucleus) and often appears as white wedge, working from the periphery of the lens and moves into the center of the lens like a spoke.

Symptoms & Signs

Cataracts begin small and have little effect to a person vision however overtime you will notice that your vision will become a bit hazy and blurred.   You may notice that you become more sensitive to light as well.  The symptoms that are experienced often vary from person to person as well as on the type of cataract that has developed.  An eye exam can give you an official diagnosis.

Causes

The lens of your eye acts similar to a camera lens.  Light is focused onto the retina which gives you clear vision.  It adjusts focus to let things be seen close and far away.  The eyes lens is made up of proteins and water.  Proteins are arranged in a way that keeps the lens clear and allows light to pass through.  As we get older the proteins may get clumped together and cloud the lens.  This is a cataract and will continue to grow making it harder and harder to see clearly. It is not exactly clear why the lens changes and form cataracts however some risk factors are:

  • Ultraviolet radiation from the sun
  • Family history
  • Abuse of alcohol
  • Hormone replacement therapy
  • Extended use of corticosteroid medication
  • Smoking
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Previous eye surgeries, injuries, and inflammation

 Prevention

There are a number of studies, mostly controversial, show that certain nutrients and nutritional supplements can help reduce the risk of cataracts.  Higher intakes of vitamin E, carotenoids lutein, and zeaxanthin from supplements and nutrients in food have shown to decrease the risk of cataracts.   Wearing sunglasses that offer 100% blockage of the suns UV rays help to reduce the chances of cataracts.  Eye vitamins, a healthy diet, and good nutrition can help in the prevention of cataracts.

Treatment

As symptoms occur your vision may be improved with new glasses, bifocal, increased lighting, and the use of other visual aids.  Surgery is only considered after cataracts have progressed and impair your vision and affect daily happenings. Most people think that bad vision occurs as a normal part of aging but surgery to correct cataracts is fairly simple, pain free, and widely available.

Cataract surgery is successful in restoring vision.  3 million Americans undergo surgery for cataracts each and every year. In fact, 9 out of 10 people regain good eye sight after cataract surgery, between 20/20 and 20/40. Surgeons remove the cloudy lens and replace it with a clear, plastic intraocular lens, IOL.

Recovery

It is important to take time to recover from surgery.  Don’t plan on driving for a few days and avoid strenuous lifting and activities.  It is important not to bend over or put pressure on your eye.

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.